Evidence of Citizenship

Evidence of Citizenship means obtaining an Australian Citizenship Certificate

Who is and who isn’t an Australian citizen?

Who is or isn’t an Australian depends on what the Citizenship laws of the day prescribed at a particular time. To be certain if a person is eligible to apply for an Australian Citizenship Certificate, careful analysis must be made on an individual basis. Making assumptions or comparisons to other cases that may seem similar can be detrimental and cause significant issues down the track.

Note: Only Australian citizens should apply for Evidence of Citizenship and the information provided on this website is specific to New Zealand citizens/New Zealand passport holders only.

Citizenship Certificates can be provided to applicants who either have citizenship by:

1. Automatic Acquisition

2. Application by Conferral

3. Application by Descent

Automatic Acquisition

  • A child born in Australia may have acquired citizenship automatically at their birth or on their 10th birthday.

Application by Conferral

  • A person may have received citizenship by conferral if they were considered a permanent resident prior to applying for and being granted Australian citizenship.

Application by Descent

  • A person may have received citizenship by descent if they were born outside of Australia to an Australian citizen parent, made an application for and granted Citizenship by Descent.

Why apply for an Australian Citizenship Certificate?

  • Proof of Australian citizenship
  • Evidence used to apply for an Australian passport
  • Replace a lost or damaged certificate
  • Change of name or correction of details

​’For the purposes of Evidence of Citizenship, the main focus will be on children born in Australia to *New Zealand parents who were subclass TY444 visa holders at the time of their child’s birth.’

PRE 20 AUGUST 1986

Children born in Australia to New Zealand citizen parents who are exempt non-citizens prior to 20 August 1986 are Australian citizens at birth

20 AUGUST 1986 TO 31 AUGUST 1994

Children born to New Zealand citizens who are exempt non-citizens are not Australian citizens at birth. They may acquire citizenship on their 10th birthday if they meet certain criteria.

1 SEPTEMBER 1994 TO 26 FEBRUARY 2001

Children born to SCV holders are Australian citizens at birth.

27 FEBRUARY 2001 TO CURRENT

Children born to protected SCV holders also known as eligible New Zealand citizens are Australian citizens at birth.

27 FEBRUARY 2001 TO CURRENT

Children born to non-protected SCV holders are not Australian citizens at birth.

27 FEBRUARY 2001 TO CURRENT

Children born to New Zealand parents who hold a permanent visa or are dual Australian citizens at the time of their birth are Australian citizens at birth.

​A child born to TY444 New Zealand citizen parents is an Australian citizen if they were either:

​1. Born in Australia and lived in Australia for the first 10 years of their life from 0 to the day of their 10th birthday.

OR

​2. Born in Australia and either of their New Zealand parents were/are recognised as Eligible New Zealand citizens otherwise known as ‘Protected SCV’ holders at the time of the child’s birth.

​OR

3. If a child is born in Australia to a New Zealand citizen parent and the other parent is an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or Eligible New Zealand citizen, they are an Australian citizen at birth.

OR

​4. If a child is born in Australia to New Zealand parents between the 1st September 1994 and the 26th February 2001, they are Australian citizens at birth.

OR

5. If a child was born in Australia to New Zealand parents up to the 19th August 1986, they are Australian citizens at birth.

​OR

6. If a child were born to New Zealand parents between the 19th August 1986 and the 31st August 1994, they would have had to live in Australia for the first 10 years of their life. Then they would have been automatically granted Australian citizenship on their 10th birthday.

Note: Children subject to the 10 year rule are not restricted from applying for citizenship if they travelled overseas for short holidays or trips between the ages of 0 and 10 years of age. Careful consideration and advice should be sought for children who were overseas for prolonged periods of time.

​How to apply for an Australian Citizenship Certificate?

Applications for Evidence of Citizenship can be made either online by creating an online ImmiAccount or via paper application.

​A responsible parent can apply for children who are under 16 years old and children 16 years old, and over can apply on their own.

​How long does it take for an application for an Australian Citizenship Certificate to process?

Processing times vary from month to month but in our experience it can take anywhere from 1 day to 6 weeks to process.

How much does it cost to apply?

​The Department of Home Affairs’ fee is $240 for each Citizenship Certificate.

​Can Morunga Migration take care of my application for me?

We would love to assist you and your family in preparing and lodging an Evidence of Citizenship application on your behalf.

Our fees for preparing and lodging applications are provided following a consultation only. We must undertake a full assessment of your situation first.

​What evidence is needed?

​If evidence is required to prove the first 10 years of residency, then you can include (but not restricted to) records such as immunisation and school records . You can use school reports or a letter from the school confirming years of enrolment between the child’s 5th and 10th birthdays.

​For children who were citizens at birth, evidence of parents’ immigration status is important. You can use the parent’s of the child’s birth certificate, Australian citizenship certificate, permanent visa or movement records.

​All other supporting documentation includes identity documents, proof of address, a passport sized photo and a Form 1195 – Identity Declaration.

Further details can be found on the Department of Home Affairs website ‘Get a Citizenship Certificate‘.

​*All subclass TY444 visa holders except by a parent who was a diplomatic representative of New Zealand